Conservation and restoration of parchment - Wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conservation_and_restoration_of_parchment
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Humidification is a parchment conservation treatment which involves the controlled and monitored increase in relative humidity. Humidified parchments are more ... Conservation and restoration of parchment From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to navigationJump to search Illustration of a German parchmenter from 1568 The conservation and restoration of parchment constitutes the care and treatment of parchment materials which have cultural and historical significance. Typically undertaken by professional book and document conservators, this process can include preventive measures which protect against future deterioration as well as specific treatments to alleviate changes already caused by agents of deterioration. 1 Parchment manufacturing and properties 1.1 Physical and chemical properties 4 Ethical concerns of conservation 5.1 Removal of previous restorations 5.4 Flattening, tensioning and drying 5.5 Mending and in-filling losses Parchment manufacturing and properties[edit] The making of parchment in the Netherlands Parchment is the skin of an animal, usually sheep, calf or goat, which has been dehaired, processed with a lime solution and stretched under tension. The dried material is a thin membrane which is most commonly used as a writing surface, but can also be used to make other items like bookbindings and drumheads. Throughout Europe, parchment was the primary writing substrate from its development in the 2nd century BCE through the Middle Ages, though it is used through the present day for various official documents. [1] Typically parchment made from calfskin is called vellum, though the term can also be used to refer to very fine quality parchment made from the skins of other animals. For the purposes of conservation and restoration, the term parchment is used in reference to vellum objects, as the terms have been used interchangeably throughout time to refer to objects with the same conservation concerns. [2]



Recent Developments in the Conservation of Parchment Manuscripts

https://cool.culturalheritage.org/coolaic/sg/bpg/annual/v15/bp15-14.html
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After a series of modifications to the original design the Ultrasonic Mister was quickly adapted for use in paper conservation. Most recently, a slightly more modified ... The American Institute for Conservation Recent Developments in the Conservation of Parchment Manuscripts Over the past ten years many new developments have been made in the field of parchment conservation both in the U.S. and abroad. Three of the most exciting developments have occurred in the areas of media consolidation, humidification, and repair. While some of these new techniques have been developed by conservators and scientists specifically for the treatment of parchment, many methods have been adapted from the closely related field of paper conservation. Flaking and friable media on parchment can be a challenging problem, especially if the manuscript is still in bound form. The paint and/or writing ink can be unstable for many reasons including: improper preparation of the parchment surface or the media itself; desiccation of the binder upon ageing; abrasion to the paint surface; stress caused by excessive flexing of the parchment support; or inherent instability of the media. The aim of any consolidation treatment is to arrest the flaking process and to ensure that no further loss occurs. The consolidant should be compatible with both the media and the support, should not create any visual change in the area being treated, and should have good ageing characteristics. In addition, the technique for applying the consolidant should be highly controllable such that the surrounding media is not disturbed and only the minimum amount of consolidant is deposited on the flaking paint or ink.



BPG Parchment - Wiki

https://www.conservation-wiki.com/wiki/BPG_Parchment
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The immediate aim of the initial conservation ... by a layer of moist blotting paper, while a wooden ... Main Catalogs Page > Materials and Treatment > Paper Conservation Catalog > BPG Parchment Parchment is typically described as a highly stressed sheet material with a stiff handle which is made from the skins of small domesticated animals such as calves, sheep and goats, that are cleaned of their hair and flesh and then dried under tension on a frame. Vellum, which derives from the Latin word vitulus and the French word veau for calf, was often used to describe a very fine quality of parchment which was preferred for painting and illumination. However, the two words were often used interchangeably in the past, and even sometimes in combination with each other, without any clear distinction between animal type or method of preparation. Since parchment is presently the term preferred by a large number of conservators, scientists and scholars, working both in the U.S. and abroad, it has therefore been adopted for use in this chapter of the Paper Conservation Catalog. Original Compilers: Walter Newman, Abigail Quandt For a full list of the original contributors to this page, see the section below on History of This Page below. Wiki Compilers: Abigail Quandt, Rebecca Smyrl Wiki Contributors: Emily Williams, your name could be here 1.1 Identification of Parchment 1.3 History of Manufacture and Use of Parchment 1.4 Unique Qualities of Parchment as a Support 1.5 Potential Alteration/Damage to Object in Treatment 2.3 Mending, Filling and Lining Materials 2.4 Mounting and Housing Materials




Paper and Parchment Conservation

https://paperandparchmentconservation.com/
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museum quality treatment of art and artifacts on paper and parchment. 703-548- 3507. Copyright © 2019 Paper and Parchment Conservation LLC - All Rights ... museum quality treatment of art and artifacts on paper and parchment    








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