The child as held in the mind of the mother: The influence of prenatal ...

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28543330/
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Infant Ment Health J. 2010 Mar;31(2):220-241. doi: 10.1002/imhj.20253. Authors. Carolyn Joy Dayton , Alytia A Levendosky , William S Davidson , G Anne Bogat ... There was no direct association between prenatal or postnatal IPV and parenting behavior. ... Copyright © 2010 Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health. COVID-19 is an emerging, rapidly evolving situation. National Institutes of HealthNational Library of MedicineNCBI homepageLog in Access keysNCBI HomepageMyNCBI HomepageMain ContentMain Navigation . 2010 Mar;31(2):220-241. doi: 10.1002/imhj.20253. The child as held in the mind of the mother: The influence of prenatal maternal representations on parenting behaviors Carolyn Joy Dayton  1 , Alytia A Levendosky  1 , William S Davidson  1 , G Anne Bogat  1 Using a longitudinal design, this study examined the relationship of a mother's prenatal representation of her child and her parenting behavior with that child at 1 year of age in a sample of women who were either exposed or not exposed to intimate partner violence (IPV) (N = 164; M child age = 1.1 years, SD = .11 years; 52% male). Controlling for prenatal IPV, a MANCOVA analysis revealed that prenatal representational typology was significantly related to parenting behavior 1 year postpartum. Mothers whose representations were affectively deactivated (disengaged) were more behaviorally controlling with their children. Mothers whose representations were affectively overactivated (distorted) were more hostile with their children. Mothers with balanced representations demonstrated more positive parenting. Exposure to IPV did not moderate this relationship. There was no direct association between prenatal or postnatal IPV and parenting behavior. These findings suggest that prenatal representations influence postnatal parenting behavior in significant and theoretically consistent ways and that this relationship functions similarly for both abused and nonabused women. Results add to the growing literature that internal representations serve to guide behavior throughout development and suggest that maternal working models may be one important link in the intergenerational transmission of attachment relationships.



Peer support among persons with severe mental illnesses: a review of

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3363389/
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Peer support among persons with severe mental illnesses: a review of evidence ... how to talk openly about issues of power and hierarchy within the organization. ... Sells D, Davidson L, Jewell C. The treatment relationship in peer-based and ... US National Library of Medicine Search databaseSearch termSearch Journal ListWorld Psychiatryv.11(2); 2012 JunPMC3363389 World Psychiatry. 2012 Jun; 11(2): 123–128. doi: 10.1016/j.wpsyc.2012.05.009 Peer support among persons with severe mental illnesses: a review of evidence and experience LARRY DAVIDSON,1 CHYRELL BELLAMY,1 KIMBERLY GUY,1 and REBECCA MILLER1 This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Peer support is largely considered to represent a recent advance in community mental health, introduced in the 1990s as part of the mental health service user movement. Actually, peer support has its roots in the moral treatment era inaugurated by Pussin and Pinel in France at the end of the 18th century, and has re-emerged at different times throughout the history of psychiatry. In its more recent form, peer support is rapidly expanding in a number of countries and, as a result, has become the focus of considerable research. Thus far, there is evidence that peer staff providing conventional mental health services can be effective in engaging people into care, reducing the use of emergency rooms and hospitals, and reducing substance use among persons with co-occurring substance use disorders. When providing peer support that involves positive self-disclosure, role modeling, and conditional regard, peer staff have also been found to increase participants’ sense of hope, control, and ability to effect changes in their lives; increase their self-care, sense of community belonging, and satisfaction with various life domains; and decrease participants’ level of depression and psychosis.



The extent and impact of mental health problems after disaster

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/16602810/
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2006;67 Suppl 2:9-14. Authors. Jonathan R T Davidson , Alexander C McFarlane  ... COVID-19 is an emerging, rapidly evolving situation. National Institutes of HealthNational Library of MedicineNCBI homepageLog in Access keysNCBI HomepageMyNCBI HomepageMain ContentMain Navigation The extent and impact of mental health problems after disaster Jonathan R T Davidson  1 , Alexander C McFarlane Disasters are events that challenge the individual's ability to adapt, which carries the risk of adverse mental health outcomes including serious posttraumatic psychopathologies. While risk is related to degree of exposure to psychological toxins, the unique vulnerabilities of special populations within the affected community as well as secondary stressors play an important role in determining the nature and amount of morbidity. Disasters in developing countries and those associated with substantial community destruction are associated with worse outcome. Although acute responses are ubiquitous, few disasters lead to posttraumatic psychopathology in the majority of people exposed. However, the shortage of human resources in psychiatry, particularly in developing countries, places a considerable burden on psychiatric services even without the additional constraints imposed by disaster. Hence, disasters are events that invite a public health approach to mental health that better serves the needs of the individual and the affected community. Such an approach considers all available human resources and is intended to mitigate the effects of disaster before serious psychopathologic sequelae arise. This community mental health strategy allows peripheral mental health workers to mediate between survivors and specialized mental health professionals while assisting in removing barriers to treatment. To be effective when disaster occurs, this approach requires careful planning in conjunction with community consultation before implementation of formal disaster mitigation policies.



Dimensions of well-being and mental health in adulthood.

https://psycnet.apa.org/record/2003-02621-033
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Determinants of well-being or happiness and mental health include age, sex, race, education, income ... (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved) ... Bornstein, Marc H. (Ed); Davidson, Lucy (Ed); Keyes, Corey L. M. (Ed ); Moore, Kristin A. (Ed). ... Mahwah, NJ, US: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates Publishers ...---



Gerald C. Davison, PhD - USC Leonard Davis School of Gerontology

https://gero.usc.edu/faculty/gerald-c-davison-ph-d/
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In 1969-70 he was visiting associate professor at Stanford University and in 1975 -76, a National Institute of Mental Health Special Fellow at Harvard. Davison is ... Applicants Students Employees Faculty Supporters Journalists Home » Faculty » Gerald C. Davison, PhD Professor of Psychology and Gerontology Other Degree Psychology, University of Freiburg, Germany, 1962 BA, Social Relations, Harvard University, 1961 Cognitive assessment and cognitive behavior therapy of anxiety Political, philosophical, and ethical issues in clinical psychology Gerald C. Davison, PhD, is Professor of Psychology and Gerontology at the University of Southern California. Previously he was Professor and Chair of the Department of Psychology at USC (1984-1990 and 2001-2006), where he was also Director of the PhD program in clinical psychology (1979-1984).  From 1994 to 1996 he served as Interim Dean of the USC Annenberg School for Communication and from 2005 to 2006 was Interim Dean of the USC School of Architecture. From 2007 to 2012 he was William and Sylvia Kugel Dean’s Chair, Professor of Gerontology and Psychology, Dean of the USC Leonard Davis School of Gerontology and Executive Director of the Andrus Gerontology Center. Previously he was on the psychology faculty at the State University of New York at Stony Brook (1966 to 1979). In 1969-70 he was visiting associate professor at Stanford University and in 1975-76, a National Institute of Mental Health Special Fellow at Harvard. Davison is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association and has served on the Executive Committee of the Division of Clinical Psychology, on the Board of Scientific Affairs, on the Committee on Scientific Awards, and on the Council of Representatives. He is also a Charter Fellow of the American Psychological Society, a past president of the Association of Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies, and past Publications Coordinator of that organization. He is also a Distinguished Founding Fellow and a Certified Supervisor of the Academy of Cognitive Therapy. He served two terms on the National Academy of Sciences/National Research Council Committee on Techniques for the Enhancement of Human Performance and on APA’s Continuing Professional Education Committee. From 2004 to 2007 he served on the Executive Board of the Council of Graduate Departments of Psychology, and in that capacity was liaison to APA’s Board of Educational Affairs and, in 2006, Chairman of the COGDOP Board. During 2006 he served as President of the Society of Clinical Psychology (Division 12 of the American Psychological Association). From 2008 to 2012 he was a member of the World Economic Forum’s Global Council on the Aging Society. In 1988 Davison received an outstanding achievement award from APA’s Board of Social and Ethical Responsibility; in 1989 was the recipient of the Albert S. Raubenheimer Distinguished Faculty Award from USC’s College of Letters, Arts and Sciences; in 1993 won the USC Associates Award for Excellence in Teaching, a university-wide prize; in 1995 received the Distinguished Psychologist Award from the Los Angeles County Psychological Association; in 1997 was given the Outstanding Educator Award of the Association of Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies; in 2003 received the Lifetime Achievement Award from ABCT; in 2005 was the recipient of the USC Mellon Award for Excellence in Mentoring; and in 2016 won the Distinguished Scientist Award from the California Psychological Association. At USC he was a Faculty Fellow in the Center for Excellence in Teaching from 2001 to 2003.




Using a public health approach to address student mental health. ***** In other words, they are adopting a public health approach to campus mental health. ... American College Health Association (2008) National College Health ... Davidson, L., Ayash, C. (2008) Case Management Teams: Early Intervention for ...

https://psycnet.apa.org/record/2010-09827-014

In other words, they are adopting a public health approach to campus mental
health. ... American College Health Association (2008) National College Health ...
Davidson, L., Ayash, C. (2008) Case Management Teams: Early Intervention for ...



Karina Davidson, PhD | Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research ***** Dr. Davidson currently holds a number of roles at Northwell Health: she is the ... of Research for Northwell Health, as well as a Professor of Behavioral Medicine at the ... Service Award, Health Psychology, American Psychological Association ... Davidson KW, Kronish IM and members of the "Personalized Trial C. Patient ...

https://feinstein.northwell.edu/institutes-researchers/.../karina-davidson-phd

Dr. Davidson currently holds a number of roles at Northwell Health: she is the ...
of Research for Northwell Health, as well as a Professor of Behavioral Medicine
at the ... Service Award, Health Psychology, American Psychological Association
... Davidson KW, Kronish IM and members of the "Personalized Trial C. Patient ...



Recovery in Serious Mental Illness: A New Wine or Just a New Bottle? ***** Davidson, Larry: Program on Recovery and Community Health at Yale University, New Haven, CT, ... Evans, Arthur C.: Connecticut Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services, CT, US ... Holder: American Psychological Association.

https://psycnet.apa.org/record/2005-13212-004

Davidson, Larry: Program on Recovery and Community Health at Yale University,
New Haven, CT, ... Evans, Arthur C.: Connecticut Department of Mental Health
and Addiction Services, CT, US ... Holder: American Psychological Association.




Value of Peers Infographics: General Peer Support ***** mental health conditions, substance use disorders, or ... experience of recovery from a mental health ... (Davidson, et al., 1999). ... recovery and offering hope ( Davidson, ... Forchuk, C., Martin, M. L., Chan, Y. L., & Jensen, E. (2005). ... Care Delivery and The Development of Practice Guidelines: Mental Health Association .

https://www.samhsa.gov/sites/default/files/.../brss.../peer-support-2017.pdf

mental health conditions, substance use disorders, or ... experience of recovery
from a mental health ... (Davidson, et al., 1999). ... recovery and offering hope (
Davidson, ... Forchuk, C., Martin, M. L., Chan, Y. L., & Jensen, E. (2005). ... Care
Delivery and The Development of Practice Guidelines: Mental Health Association
.


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