Giuseppe Sarti - Wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giuseppe_Sarti
site-preview

Giuseppe Sarti was an Italian opera composer. Contents. 1 Biography; 2 Opera; 3 Works; 4 Editions; 5 Notes; 6 References; 7 External links. Biography[edit]. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to navigationJump to search Giuseppe Sarti (also Sardi;[1] baptised 1 December 1729 – 28 July 1802) was an Italian opera composer. He was born at Faenza. His date of birth is not known, but he was baptised on 1 December 1729. Some earlier sources say he was born on 28 December, but his baptism certificate proves the later date impossible.[2] Already organist at Faenza at age 13, he was invited to receive an education by Padre Martini in Bologna.[3] Resigning his appointment in Faenza in 1750, Sarti devoted himself to the study of dramatic music, becoming director of the Faenza theatre in 1752. In 1752 he produced his first documented opera, Il re pastore (because the date of Pompeo in Armenia is not certain). In 1753 Sarti went to Copenhagen with Pietro Mingotti and in 1755 King Frederick V of Denmark appointed him Hofkapellmeister and director of the opera. Here he produced his Ciro riconosciuto. In 1765 he travelled to Italy to engage some new singers; meanwhile the death of King Frederick put an end to his engagement for the time being. In 1766 he was appointed choir master at the Ospedale della Pietà in Venice, a position he held until 1767. In 1769 he went to London, where he could only survive by giving music lessons. In 1779 he was elected maestro di cappella at the cathedral of Milan, where he remained until 1784. Here he exercised his true vocation of composer, in addition to at least twenty of his most successful operas, a vast amount of sacred music for the cathedral, and educating a number of clever pupils, the most distinguished of whom was Cherubini. In 1784 Sarti was invited by the empress Catherine II to St. Petersburg. On his way there he stopped in Vienna, where Emperor Joseph II received him with special favour, in large part due to his opera Fra i due litiganti il terzo gode,[3] and where he made the acquaintance of Mozart. He reached St. Petersburg in 1785 and at once took the direction of the opera, for which he composed many new pieces, besides some very striking sacred music, including a Te Deum for the victory of Ochakov, in which he introduced the firing of real cannons. Sarti founded the Russian Conservatory for Music in 1793.[3] He remained in Russia until 1801, when his health was so broken that he solicited permission to return. The emperor Alexander dismissed him in 1802 with a liberal pension; letters of nobility had been granted to him by empress Catherine. His most successful operas in Russia were Armida e Rinaldo and The Early Reign of Oleg (Nachal'noye upravleniye Olega), for the latter of which the empress herself wrote the libretto. Sarti died in Berlin on his return trip.[3]



Roland Sarti | Department of History | UMass Amherst

https://www.umass.edu/history/people/roland-sarti
site-preview

Field(s) of interest: Modern Europe, Italy. Research Interests and Professional Activities A specialist on Italian and European social history, Professor Sarti is the  ... The University of Massachusetts Amherst College of Humanities & Fine Arts E-mail: sarti@history.umass.edu Field(s) of interest: Modern Europe, Italy. Research Interests and Professional Activities A specialist on Italian and European social history, Professor Sarti is the author of Fascism and the Industrial Leadership in Italy, 1919-1940 (1971) and the editor of The Ax Within: Italian Fascism in Action (1974). His Long Live the Strong: A History of Rural Society in The Appenine Mountains (1985) was awarded the 1986 Howard Marraro Prize by the Society of Italian Historical Studies for best book of the year in Italian history. His most recent publication is a biography of nineteenth-century revolutionary figure Giuseppe Mazzini entitled Mazzini: A Life for the Religion of Politics (1997). He has served as department chair, president of the New England Historical Association, and is president of the Society for Italian Historical Studies. Prof. Sarti retired from the History Department in 2002. ©2020 University of Massachusetts Amherst · Site Policies · Accessibility



Giuliano Sarti - Wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giuliano_Sarti
site-preview

Sarti is mostly remembered for successful his stints at Fiorentina and Internazionale, clubs with which he won several domestic and international trophies. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to navigationJump to search Sarti with Inter Milan in the 1960s Place of birth Castello d'Argile, Italy Date of death 5 June 2017 (aged 83) 1954–1963 Fiorentina 220 (0) 1963–1968 Internazionale 147 (0) 1969–1973 Unione Valdinievole * Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only Giuliano Sarti (Italian pronunciation: [dʒuˈljaːno ˈsarti]; 2 October 1933 – 5 June 2017) was an Italian professional football player, who played in the position of goalkeeper. Throughout his successful career, he played for several Italian clubs, although he is mostly remembered for his success with Fiorentina, and as the goalkeeper of the "Grande Inter" side of the 1960s that conquered both Italy and Europe. Sarti is mostly remembered for successful his stints at Fiorentina and Internazionale, clubs with which he won several domestic and international trophies. After starting his career in the lower divisions with season long stints at Centese (1952–53) and Bondenese (1953–54), he moved to Fiorentina in 1954, where he soon managed to obtain a place in the team's starting line-up despite competition from Leonardo Costagliola initially, and later Enrico Albertosi. During his time with the club (1954–63), he won the Serie A, the Coppa Italia and the European Cup Winners' Cup titles.[1][2][3] Sarti (crouched, second from right) with Fiorentina scudettata in the 1955–56 season Sarti is particularly regarded for his role as the starting keeper in the highly successful "Grande Inter" side of the 1960s under manager Helenio Herrera. He joined the club in 1963, and during his time with the team, he formed a legendary partnership with fullbacks Burgnich and Facchetti, as well as sweeper Armando Picchi, in Inter's tenacious "catenaccio" defence that helped the team to conquer Italian, European, and World football. During his five seasons with the club, he won two Serie A titles, two European Cups, and two Intercontinental Cups. After leaving Inter in 1968, he later spent the 1968–69 season with Juventus as a back-up to Roberto Anzolin. He subsequently joined Unione Valdinievole the following season, where he remained until his retirement in 1973.[1][2][3]










Ads