Former Sheriff of Tallahatchie County Sentenced to Federal Prison ...

https://www.justice.gov/.../former-sheriff-tallahatchie-county-sentenced- federal-prison-accepting-bribes
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Apr 18, 2019 ... OXFORD – The former Sheriff of Tallahatchie County was sentenced to six years in federal prison on Thursday for agreeing to allow robbery of ... U.S. Attorneys » Northern District of Mississippi » News Northern District of Mississippi Former Sheriff of Tallahatchie County Sentenced to Federal Prison for Accepting Bribes OXFORD – The former Sheriff of Tallahatchie County was sentenced to six years in federal prison on Thursday for agreeing to allow robbery of a drug dealer and drug distribution in Tallahatchie County in exchange for bribes.  William Brewer, 58, appeared before U.S. District Judge Michael P. Mills in Oxford for sentencing following his guilty plea for extorting a bribe, and Mills imposed the 72-month sentence.  In addition, Brewer was sentenced to serve three years of supervised release upon his release from prison and to forfeit $42,500.  Christopher Freeze, Special Agent in Charge of the FBI Jackson Division and William C. Lamar, US Attorney for the Northern District of Mississippi, made the announcement following the sentence. Evidence showed that a source cooperating with the FBI who was known by Brewer to sell drugs in Tallahatchie County, informed Brewer of plans to rob another drug dealer of drugs and money.  Brewer did nothing to oppose the actions of the individual and the individual delivered $6,500 cash to Brewer at his residence in Tallahatchie County on June 21, 2018, representing that the cash was money obtained from robbing the drug dealer.  On two subsequent occasions, the individual delivered additional payments to Brewer’s residence representing that they were proceeds from the sale of the stolen drugs.  The evidence established that Brewer accepted a total of $10,000 in bribes over a two-month period.





Sheriff Clarence Strider | American Experience | Official Site | PBS

https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/.../emmett-biography-sheriff-clarence-strider/
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An imposing man weighing 270 pounds, Strider was the sheriff of Tallahatchie County and a wealthy plantation owner in the heart of the cotton-growing Delta. THE MURDER OF EMMETT TILL | ARTICLE Mississippi sheriff Clarence Strider became an unforgettable symbol of southern intransigence in the 1955 Emmett Till case. Clarence Strider, Courtesy: The Commercial Appeal An imposing man weighing 270 pounds, Strider was the sheriff of Tallahatchie County and a wealthy plantation owner in the heart of the cotton-growing Delta. His property could be identified from miles away by the letters S-T-R-I-D-E-R, which he insisted be painted on the roofs of sharecroppers' shacks. Strider was the first official to learn that a body had been discovered by a young man fishing in the Tallahatchie River. He hoped to bury the body right away, and even ordered Emmett Till's Mississippi relatives to get his body in the ground by nightfall. But when Emmett's mother learned in Chicago that he had been found, she demanded that the body be sent home. Strider trumpeted to the local press that the case would be investigated, but changed his mind once the case gained nationwide attention and scorn. In a press conference that stunned many outsiders, Strider summed up what many in the local white community felt: "We never have any trouble until some of our Southern niggers go up North and the NAACP talks to 'em and they come back home. If they would keep their nose and mouths out of our business we would be able to do more when enforcing the laws of Tallahatchie County and Mississippi." Black journalists in a separate area. Courtesy: The Commercial Appeal Strider lorded over the courtroom and refused to admit African American journalists to see the proceedings against the accused, Roy Bryant and his half-brother, J. W. Milam. When Judge Curtis Swango overruled him, Strider segregated them from the white journalists and placed them at a card table off to the side of the courtroom. Then, when African American Congressman Charles Diggs arrived from Detroit, Strider refused to let him in. A black journalist tried to explain Diggs' status to Strider, but the sheriff and his deputies remained incredulous. "This nigger said there's a nigger outside who says he's a congressman." To which another deputy replied: "A nigger congressman?"



Deputy Sheriff Dave H. Jennings, Jr., Tallahatchie County Sheriff's ...

https://www.odmp.org/officer/7098-deputy-sheriff-dave-h-jennings-jr
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Deputy Sheriff Dave H. Jennings, Jr. Tallahatchie County Sheriff's Office, Mississippi. End of Watch Saturday, August 28, 1976. Add to My Heroes. Deputy Sheriff Dave H. Jennings, Jr. United StatesMississippiTallahatchie County Sheriff's OfficeDeputy Sheriff Dave H. Jennings, Jr. Deputy Sheriff Dave H. Jennings, Jr. Tallahatchie County Sheriff's Office, Mississippi End of Watch Saturday, August 28, 1976 Deputy Jennings was shot and killed after responding to a shooting call on Deep Slue Road. When he arrived at the scene he encountered man sitting in a car that had been backed into a ditch. As Deputy Jennings approached the man another man shouted to the deputy that the man had just shot his daughter. At the same time the man in the car attacked Deputy Jennings. During the ensuing struggle the man was able to gain control of Deputy Jennings' service weapon and shot him. Deputy Jennings returned fire with a backup weapon, wounding the suspect. The suspect fled the scene in Deputy Jennings' patrol car. He was arrested a short time later, charged in connection with Deputy Jennings' death, and convicted of capital murder. Deputy Jennings had served in law enforcement for 41 years. He was survived by his wife and three children. Rest in peace always knowing that your service and sacrifice will never, ever be forgotten. Delaware State Police (Retired) Want even more control of your Reflection? Create a free ODMP account now for these benefits: View, edit or delete any Reflection you've left in the past Create an account for more options, or use this form to leave a Reflection now. I have read and agree to the Reflections Terms of Use (revised 5/31/2012)








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